How To Crochet A Front Post Double Crochet Stitch

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In this blog post, you will see how to crochet a front post double crochet stitch.

The front post double crochet stitch is a great technique to add texture and dimension to your crochet projects. 

It involves working around the post of a stitch instead of into the top loops, creating a raised effect on the front of the work. 

With this stitch, you can create crochet cables, ribbing, and other interesting patterns. 

In this tutorial, we will go through the step-by-step process of crocheting a front post double crochet stitch. 

You’ll need some basic crochet skills, such as how to chain and how to work the double crochet stitch, to follow along.

You will find a video tutorial to help you with the written instructions. 

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How to Front Post Double Crochet Stitch

What Does Front Post Double Crochet Mean? 

A front post double crochet stitch (fpdc) is a technique used to create texture and dimension in your crochet projects. 

This stitch is worked around the post (or vertical stem) of the stitch from the previous row rather than into the top loops. 

To make an fpdc, you start by yarn over (yo), then insert your crochet hook from the front of your work to the back and then back to the front around the post of the designated stitch. 

Yarn over again, pull up a loop around the post, and complete the double crochet stitch as normal by yarning over and pulling through two loops twice. 

This method pushes the post of the stitch forward, creating a raised stitch on the front side (right side) of your fabric. 

FPdc stitches are often used in combination with other stitches to create textured patterns, cables, or ribbing in crochet projects, adding visual interest and depth to the finished piece.

Time needed: 15 minutes

How To Crochet A Front Post Double Crochet Stitch

  1. Step 1 – Insert the hook

    To make an fpdc, you start by yarn over (yo), then insert your crochet hook from the front of your work to the back and then back to the front around the post of the designated stitch.  front post double crochet step 1

  2. Step 2 – Yarn over again

    Yarn over again, pull up a loop around the post, stretching it tall to the height of the previous stitch.crochet front post double crochet step 2

  3. Step 3 – Complete the stitch

    Complete the double crochet stitch as usual by yarning over and pulling through two loops twice. crochet front post double crochet step 3

Video Tutorial

Watch this video tutorial to learn How to crochet a front post double crochet stitch.

What Is The Difference Between Front Post And Back Post? 

The only difference between front post and back post stitches lies in the direction from which you approach the post of a stitch from the previous row. 

In both techniques, you work around the post instead of into the top loops of the stitch.

  • Front Post: With a front post crochet stitch (such as front post double crochet or fpdc), you insert your crochet hook from the front of your work to the back and then to the front again around the post of the designated stitch. This method pushes the post forward, creating a raised stitch on the front side (right side) of your fabric and often resulting in a ribbed or textured effect.
  • Back Post: Conversely, for a back post crochet stitch (like back post double crochet or bpdc), you insert your hook from the back of your work to the front and then to the back again around the post of the stitch. This pulls the post backward, creating a raised stitch on the back side (wrong side) of your fabric while leaving a different texture on the front side. The front side may display raised ridges or a textured appearance, depending on the stitch pattern used.

What Is The Best Yarn Weight For A Front Post Double Crochet Stitch? 

The best yarn weight for a front post double crochet (fpdc) stitch depends on the specific project you’re working on and the desired outcome. 

Generally, medium-weight yarns such as worsted weight yarn or light worsted weight yarn are ideal for fpdc stitches. 

These yarn weights provide enough substance and structure to showcase the texture created by the fpdc without making the fabric too bulky or stiff.

For projects where you want the fpdc stitches to stand out prominently and create gorgeous textures, using a slightly lighter weight yarn like DK (double knit) weight or sport weight can also work well. 

Thinner yarns allow for more precise stitch definition and can result in a more delicate appearance.

Conversely, using heavier yarn weights like bulky or super bulky may diminish the definition of the fpdc stitches and result in a thicker, more substantial fabric. 

Ultimately, the choice of yarn weight for fpdc stitches depends on your preference for the look and feel of the finished project. 

Experimenting with different yarn weights and hook sizes will help you achieve the desired effect and enhance the visual impact of the fpdc stitch in your crochet work.

Crochet Lessons

If you are a new maker and need help with the crochet basics or you need a refresher, check out the crochet lessons here – Crochet Lessons {With Video Tutorials}.

There, you will find tutorial posts for all the crochet techniques a newbie needs to know (most posts include a photo tutorial and a YouTube video tutorial).

This includes how to make a slip knot, how to create foundation chain stitches (ch), and how to crochet the basic stitches, such as single crochet stitches (sc), half double crochet stitches (hdc), double crochet stitches (dc).

It also includes how to make a single crochet decrease and all the crochet stitch abbreviations (in UK and US terms) a maker needs to know.  

And if you need more free video instructions, check out my YouTube channel here – Handy Little Me – YouTube 

Could you share your work with us?

I love seeing your finished projects on social media.

If you enjoyed making the front post double crochet, I’d love to see yours on Instagram, be sure to 

tag me @handylittleme or #handylittleme to be featured.

If you are on Facebook, stop over to the Handylittleme Facebook group and share a photo.

You can also find us on Pinterest, Etsy, and Ravelry.

Happy Crocheting! 

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