How To Count Rows In Knitting

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In this blog post, you will learn how to count rows in knitting.

Counting rows in knitting is an important skill for all makers, intermediate or beginner knitters. 

It’s essential for keeping track of your project, troubleshooting mistakes, and maintaining consistency on all parts of your project.

If you are knitting a scarf counting rows might not be absolutely necessary. 

But if you are making a garment that is divided into panels it’s essential for your pieces to have the same size. 

And it’s part of keeping track of your progress and ensuring that your project turns out the way you want it to. 

Overall, keeping an accurate count track of rows is an important part of the knitting basics that helps ensure that your project turns out the way you want it to. 

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How to count rows in knitting for beginners

How To Count Rows In Knitting | A Step-by-Step Guide

  1. Lay your knitting on a flat surface, such as a table or the floor, making sure that it is not twisted or bunched up.
  2. Locate the edge of your knitting where you want to start counting. This can be the cast-on edge, the side edge, or the edge of a particular section of your knitting.
  3. Using your index finger or a knitting needle, a pen, or a pencil, trace the stitches of the row directly below the row you want to count. Count each stitch as you go, keeping track of the number.
  4. When you reach the end of the row, make a mental note of the number you counted, or write it down if you need to keep track of multiple knitting rows.
  5. Repeat this process for each row you want to count, making sure to start at the correct edge and count each stitch.

The easiest way to keep track of your rows, you can use a row counter tool, which is a small device that attaches to your finger or knitting needle and allows you to keep track of the number of rows you have knitted.

Simply click the counter up by one each time you complete a row.

Knitting row counter

Does the row on the needle count in knitting?    

Yes, the row on the needle does count in knitting.

When you are counting rows in knitting, you count each completed row, as well as the row that is currently on the needle. 

For example, if you have knitted 10 completed rows and you are currently working on the 11th row, you would count this as 11 rows in total.

The row on the needle is considered a “live” stitch and it will become a completed row once you finish knitting it. 

It’s important to include the row on the needle when counting rows, especially if you need to keep track of the number of rows you have knitted for a specific pattern or project.

counting knitting rows

Does the cast-on row count as row one?    

In most cases, the cast-on row is not counted as row 1 when counting rows in knitting.

This is because the cast-on row is considered to be the foundation row of your knitting and not a completed row in the pattern.

When counting rows in knitting, you typically start counting from the first row of the pattern stitch that you are working on.

For example, if you are knitting in stockinette stitch, you would start counting from the first row of knit stitches after the cast on row.

Similarly, if you are working in garter stitch, you would count each ridge created by the knit and purl rows as a single row.

However, there are some patterns where the cast on row is counted as the first row.

In these cases, the pattern will usually specify this in the pattern instructions.

Always follow the instructions provided in the pattern you are working on to determine how to count rows.

Related Post – How To Cast On Knitting

how to count rows in knitting

Is casting off considered a row?

No, casting off (also known as binding off) is not considered a row in knitting.

When you cast off, you are creating a finished edge on your knitting by working the stitches and then lifting one stitch over another until you have only one stitch remaining on the needle.

Casting off is the final step in completing a knitting project, and it does not add any additional rows to your work. 

When counting rows in knitting, you count each completed row of stitches, but not the act of binding off at the end of your work.

It’s important to note that some patterns may instruct you to work a certain number of bind-off stitches, which may affect the overall length or shape of your finished project.

However, this is usually referred to as a “bind-off” instruction rather than a “row” instruction.

Related Post: How To Cast Off Knitting For Total Beginners (Step by Step)

counting garter stitch rows

How To Count Rows In Different Knitting Stitches And Techniques.

How to count rows in knitting garter stitch?

Counting rows of garter stitch can be a little different from counting rows in other types of knitting stitches, such as stockinette stitch.

In garter stitch, each ridge of bumps counts as two rows, since you are essentially knitting two rows (one on the right side of your work and one on the wrong side of your work) to create each ridge.

Here are some steps you can follow to count rows in garter stitch:

  1. Look at the side of your knitting where you want to count the rows. 
  2. You should see a series of ridges, with each ridge made up of two rows of bumps.
  3. Identify the first ridge you want to count.
  4. This is usually the ridge at the bottom of your work, closest to the cast-on edge.
  5. Use your finger or a knitting needle to trace the bumps along the ridge, counting each bump as you go. Remember that each ridge counts as two rows.
  6. Once you have counted the bumps on the first ridge, move up to the next ridge and repeat the process, counting each bump as two rows.
  7. Continue counting in this way, working your way up the side of your knitting until you have counted all the rows you need to.
  8. By counting each ridge as two rows, you can accurately keep track of the number of rows you have knitted in garter stitch.

Related Post – How To Knit Garter Stitch

how to count rows in garter stitch

How to count rows in knitting stocking stitch?

Counting stockinette stitch rows (also known as stocking stitch) can be a little tricky because the right side of the fabric looks different from the wrong side.

However, with a little practice, you can learn to identify the rows and keep track of your progress.

Here are some steps you can follow to count rows in stocking stitch:

  • Look at the side of your knitting where you want to count the rows. 
  • The right side of the fabric should have “V” shaped stitches, while the wrong side should have “purl bumps” or purl stitches.
  • Identify the first “V” or knit stitch on the right side of the fabric. This stitch should be part of the first completed row.
  • Follow the line of “V” stitches up the knit side of the fabric, counting each “V” stitch as one row.
  • Once you reach the end of the row, turn your work and look at the opposite side. The first row of bumps should be directly below the last row of “V” stitches you counted.
  • Count the row of bumps on the purl side, making sure to count each bump as one row.
  • Continue counting in this way, working your way up the fabric by counting the “V” stitches on the right side and the bumps on the wrong side.
  • By counting both the “V” stitches on the right side and the bumps on the wrong side, you can accurately keep track of the number of rows you have knitted in stocking stitch.

Related Post – How To Knit Stockinette Stitch (For Beginners)

how to count rows in stocking stitch with needle

How to count rows in reverse stockinette stitch pattern?

Counting rows in reverse stockinette stitch pattern is similar to counting rows in regular stockinette stitch but with a few differences.

Here are some methods you can use to count rows in reverse stockinette stitch:

  • Count the ridges: Reverse stockinette stitch has a bumpy texture, which creates ridges on the wrong side of the fabric. Count the number of ridges on the wrong side of the fabric to determine the number of rows worked.
  • Remember that each ridge represents two rows, so you will need to divide the total number of ridges by two to get the number of rows worked.
  • Count the purl stitches: In reverse stockinette stitch, the purl stitches are worked on the right side of the fabric, so you can count the number of purl stitches to determine the number of rows worked. Count the number of purl stitches in a column and multiply that number by two to get the number of rows worked.
how to count rows in reverse stocking stitch

How to count rows in a rib stitch pattern?

Counting rows in rib stitch can be a bit more challenging than in other knitting stitches, as the pattern alternates between knit and purl stitches.

However, with some practice, you can learn to identify the rows and keep track of your progress.

Here are some steps you can follow to count rows in rib stitch:

  • Look at the side of your knitting where you want to count the rows. The rib stitch pattern should have columns of knit stitches alternating with columns of purl stitches.
  • Identify the first column of knit stitches. This column should be part of the first completed row.
  • Count the number of knit stitches in this column, and make a mental note of the number.
  • Move to the next column of purl stitches, and count the number of purl stitches in this column. Make a mental note of this number as well.
  • Add the number of knit stitches and the number of purl stitches together to get the total number of stitches in one rib stitch pattern repeat.
  • Continue counting in this way, working your way up the fabric by counting the number of knit stitches and purl stitches in each column.
  • Once you have completed one full repeat of the rib stitch pattern, you have completed one row.
  • By counting the number of knit and purl stitches in each column, you can accurately keep track of the number of rows you have knitted in rib stitch. 
  • Remember to count each completed repeat of the rib stitch pattern as one row.

Related Post – How To Knit Rib Stitch Patterns (1×1 and 2×2 ribbing)

how to count rows in 1x1 ribbing

How to count rows in knitting seed stitch (moss stitch)?

Counting rows in seed stitch can be a bit more challenging than in other knitting stitches, as the pattern alternates between knit and purl stitches in each row.

However, with some practice, you can learn to identify the rows and keep track of your progress.

Here are some steps you can follow to count rows in seed stitch:

  • Look at the side of your knitting where you want to count the rows. The seed stitch pattern should have alternating knit and purl stitches in each row, with the purl stitches above the knit stitches in one row and below the knit stitches in the next row.
  • Identify the first column of knit stitches. This column should be part of the first completed row.
  • Count the number of knit stitches in this column, and make a mental note of the number.
  • Move to the next column of purl stitches, and count the number of purl stitches in this column. Make a mental note of this number as well.
  • Continue counting in this way, alternating between counting the knit and purl stitches in each column.
  • Once you have counted all the stitches in the row, make a mental note of the number of stitches in the row.
  • On the next row, start again by counting the number of knit stitches in the first column, then the number of purl stitches in the next column, and so on.
  • Once you have completed one full cycle of the seed stitch pattern (i.e., one row of knit stitches over purl stitches followed by one row of purl stitches over knit stitches), you have completed one row.
  • By counting the number of knit and purl stitches in each column, you can accurately keep track of the number of rows you have knitted in seed stitch.
  • Remember to count each completed cycle of the seed stitch pattern as one row.

Related Post – How To Knit Seed Stitch For Beginners

how to count rows in moss stitch

How to count purl rows in knitting?

Counting purl rows in knitting can be done in a few different ways depending on the type of knitting pattern you are working on.

Here are a few methods you can try:

  • Counting the bumps: One way to count purl rows is to count the “bumps” that are formed by the purl stitches. On the right side of the fabric, the purl stitches create a series of bumps, while the knit stitches form smooth V-shaped columns. On the wrong side (ws) of the fabric, this is reversed. To count purl rows, turn your work so that you are looking at the right side (rs) of the fabric, and count the number of bumps. Each bump represents one purl stitch, so the number of bumps is equal to the number of purl stitches in the row.
  • Counting the Vs: If you prefer, you can also count purl rows by counting the number of knit stitches in the row instead of the purl stitches. To do this, turn your work so that you are looking at the wrong side of the fabric, and count the number of V-shaped columns created by the knit stitches.
  • Each V represents one knit stitch, so the number of Vs is equal to the number of knit stitches in the row. 
  • Since every knit row is followed by a purl row in stockinette stitch, the number of knit rows is equal to the number of purl rows.
  • By using one of these methods, you can accurately count the number of purl rows in your knitting project. Remember to count each completed row, whether it is a knit row or a purl row, as one row.

Related Post – How To Knit The Purl Stitch (For Beginners + A Video Tutorial)

how to count rows in purl knitting

How to track of the rows when knitting in the round?

Counting rows when knitting in the round can be a bit trickier than counting rows in flat knitting since the rows are continuous and there is no clear beginning or end to each row. 

However, there are a few methods you can use to keep track of your progress:

  • Use a stitch marker: Place a stitch marker at the beginning of your round, and move it up every time you complete a round. This way, you can count the number of times you have moved the stitch marker and know how many rounds you have completed. This is a simple and effective way to keep track of your progress.
  • Use a piece of contrasting yarn: Thread a contrasting piece of yarn through a stitch at the beginning of your round, and move it up every time you complete a round. This way, you can count the number of times you have moved the contrasting yarn and know how many rounds you have completed. Once you have finished your project, you can simply remove the contrasting yarn.

Related Post – How To Join Knitting In The Round With Circular Knitting Needles

How to count rows in loom knitting?

Counting rows in loom knitting is similar to counting rows in regular knitting, but there are a few differences you should be aware of.

Here are some methods you can use to count rows in loom knitting:

  • Count the rows on the loom: One way to count rows in loom knitting is to count the number of rows on the loom itself.
  • This works best if you are using a loom with clearly defined rows or pegs, such as a knitting board or a long loom.
  • Count the number of rows from the beginning of your work up to the current row, and record the number somewhere so you can refer to it later.
  • Count the stitches: Another way to count rows in loom knitting is to count the number of stitches in each row.
  • This works best if you are working on a simple stitch pattern, such as stockinette stitch or garter stitch.
  • Count the number of stitches in each row as you go, and keep a tally mark of the number of rows you have completed.

How to count rows in cable knitting?

Counting rows in cable knitting can be a bit challenging since the cables create a pattern that can be difficult to discern. 

However, here are some tips you can use to help you count rows in cable knitting:

  • Count the garter stitch rows: In most cable patterns, the cables are set against a background of garter stitch, which creates ridges that can be counted to determine the number of rows completed.
  • Count the number of ridges between each cable section to determine the number of rows worked.
  • Count the cable repeats: Many cable patterns have a repeating pattern of cables, so you can count the number of times the cable pattern is repeated to determine the number of rows worked. Keep track of the number of repeats on a piece of paper.

Related Post – 8 Cable Stitch Knitting Patterns

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