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How Much Yarn To Crochet A Baby Blanket (+ Chart)

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This blog post shows how much yarn to crochet a baby blanket (+ Chart).

If you plan to make a crochet blanket for a baby, one of the most important things you need to figure out is the amount of yarn you need.  

Continue reading, and you will learn everything about crochet baby blanket sizes and how much yarn you need to crochet each one. 

How much yarn to crochet a baby blanket

Crochet Baby Blanket Patterns 

Crochet baby blankets are a popular choice for many parents because they are soft, warm, and comfortable for babies. 

They are also durable and can withstand frequent washing, which is important when dealing with messy little ones. 

In addition, crochet baby blankets can be customized from the size of the blanket to the color scheme. 

Finally, making a crochet baby blanket can be a fun and rewarding project for those who enjoy crafting, and it can also be a thoughtful gift for a new parent.

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What Are The Sizes Of Crochet Baby Blankets? 

Crochet baby blankets come in many different sizes depending on the intended use and personal preferences. 

Here are some common blanket sizes:

  1. Security Blanket/Lovey
  • Size: 12 inches to 18 inches square.
  • These small blankets are often used as comfort objects or for babies to snuggle with.
  1. Stroller Baby Blanket 
  • Size: 24 inches by 30 inches or 30 inches by 36 inches
  • These dimensions provide enough coverage for a small baby or small child in a stroller while still being a manageable size for portability
  1. Receiving Blanket
  • Size: 30 inches by 30 inches to 36 inches by 36 inches.
  • Receiving blankets are versatile and can be used for swaddling, covering, or as a light layer.
  1. Standard Baby Blanket
  • Size: 36 inches by 36 inches to 40 inches by 40 inches.
  • This size is suitable for a crib or as a general-purpose baby blanket.
  1. Toddler Blanket
  • Size: 40 inches by 50 inches to 40 inches by 60 inches.
  • Larger than a standard baby blanket, toddler blankets are suitable for use as a transition from crib to toddler bed.
  1. Crib Blanket
  • Size: 28 inches by 52 inches.
  • Specifically designed to fit a standard crib mattress.
  1. Swaddle Blanket
  • Size: 40 inches by 40 inches to 48 inches by 48 inches.
  • These blankets are often used for swaddling newborns
CROCHET BABY BLANKET SIZES

How Much Yarn Do You Need For A Baby Blanket?

The size of your blanket is the main factor that affects how much yarn you need; others might be the stitch pattern, the yarn weight, the hook size, and your tension. 

Different sizes of blankets have different yardage requirements.

Usually, the crochet blanket pattern you are following will give you the yarn yardage you need. 

But if you want to make adjustments and make it into your own perfect size, this guide will help you. 

Security Blanket/Lovey

  • Fingering or Baby Weight Yarn: 1 to 2 skeins (approximately 300 to 600 yards).
  • Sport Weight Yarn: 2 to 3 skeins (approximately 600 to 900 yards).
  • DK Weight Yarn:1 to 2 skeins (approximately 200 to 400 yards).
  • Worsted Weight Yarn: 1 skein (approximately 150 to 250 yards). 
  • Bulky Weight Yarn:1 skein (approximately 100 to 150 yards)
  • Super Bulky Weight Yarn: Less than 1 skein of yarn(approximately 50 to 100 yards).

Stroller Blanket

  • Fingering or Baby Weight Yarn: 3 to 5 skeins (approximately 600 to 1000 yards).
  • Sport Weight Yarn: 3 to 5 skeins (approximately 600 to 1000 yards).
  • DK Weight Yarn: 3 to 4 skeins (approximately 200 to 800 yards).
  • Worsted Weight Yarn: 2 to 4 skeins (approximately 400 to 800 yards). 
  • Bulky Weight Yarn: 2 to 3 skeins (approximately 200 to 450 yards).
  • Super Bulky Weight Yarn: 2 skeins (approximately 150 to 300 yards).

 Receiving Blanket:

  • Fingering or Baby Weight Yarn: 2 to 3 skeins (approximately 600 to 900 yards).
  • Sport Weight Yarn: 2 skeins (approximately 600 to 800 yards).
  • DK Weight Yarn: 2 to 3 skeins (approximately 600 to 900 yards).
  • Worsted Weight Yarn: 2 to 3 skeins (approximately 600 to 900 yards). 
  • Bulky Weight Yarn: 2 skeins (approximately 300 to 500 yards).
  • Super Bulky Weight Yarn: 1 to 2 skeins (approximately 150 to 300 yards).

Standard Baby Blanket:

  • Fingering or Baby Weight Yarn: 3 to 4 skeins (approximately 900 to 1200 yards).
  • Sport Weight Yarn: 3 skeins (approximately 800 to 1000 yards).
  • DK Weight Yarn: 3 to 4 skeins (approximately 900 to 1200 yards).
  • Worsted Weight Yarn: 2 to 3 skeins (approximately 600 to 900 yards).
  • Bulky Weight Yarn: 2 to 3 skeins (approximately 300 to 600 yards).
  • Super Bulky Weight Yarn: 1 to 2 skeins (approximately 150 to 300 yards).

Toddler Blanket:

  • Fingering or Baby Weight Yarn: 4 to 5 skeins (approximately 1200 to 1500 yards).
  • Sport Weight Yarn: 3 to 4 skeins (approximately 1000 to 1200 yards).
  • DK Weight Yarn: 4 to 6 skeins (approximately 1200 to 1800 yards).
  • Worsted Weight Yarn: 3 skeins (approximately 900 to 1200 yards).
  • Bulky Weight Yarn: 3 to 5 skeins (approximately 450 to 750 yards).
  • Super Bulky Weight Yarn: 2 to 3 skeins (approximately 300 to 450 yards).

Crib Blanket:

  • Fingering or Baby Weight Yarn: 4 to 6 skeins (approximately 1200 to 1200 yards).
  • Sport Weight Yarn: 4 to 6 skeins (approximately 800 to 1200 yards).
  • DK Weight Yarn: 4 to 6 skeins (approximately 800 to 1200 yards).
  • Worsted Weight Yarn: 3 to 5 skeins (approximately 600 to 1000 yards).
  • Bulky Weight Yarn: 3 to 5 skeins (approximately 300 to 500 yards).
  • Super Bulky Weight Yarn: 2 to 4 skeins (approximately 200 to 400 yards).

Swaddle Blanket:

  • Fingering or Baby Weight Yarn: 2 to 3 skeins (approximately 600 to 900 yards).
  • Sport Weight Yarn: 2 skeins (approximately 600 to 800 yards).
  • DK Weight Yarn: 4 to 6 skeins (approximately 1200 to 1800 yards). 
  • Worsted Weight Yarn: 3 to 5 skeins (approximately 900 to 1500 yards).
  • Bulky Weight Yarn: 2 to 4 skeins (approximately 400 to 800 yards).
  • Super Bulky Weight Yarn: 2 to 3 skeins (approximately 200 to 450 yards).

Tip: it’s always better to buy some extra to make sure you have enough yarn and don’t run out before you finish your project.

How many skeins to crochet a baby blanket chart

How Do I Know What Size Crochet Hook To Use?

Choosing the right crochet hook size is crucial for achieving the desired gauge and overall appearance of your baby blanket.

  • Fingering or Baby Weight Yarn: Recommended Hook Size: B-1 (2.25mm) to E-4 (3.5mm).
  • Sport Weight Yarn: Recommended Hook Size: E-4 (3.5mm) to G-6 (4.0mm).
  • DK Weight Yarn: Recommended Hook Size: US E/4 (3.5mm) to G/6 (4mm)
  • Worsted Weight Yarn: Recommended Hook Size: G-6 (4.0mm) to I-9 (5.5mm).
  • Bulky Weight Yarn: Recommended Hook Size: US J/10 (6mm) to L/11 (8mm). 
  • Super Bulky Weight Yarn: Recommended Hook Size: US M/13 (9mm) to Q/16 (16mm).

Always check the yarn label for the recommended gauge and suggested hook size.

Learn how to read a yarn label here How To Read A Yarn Label (Step By Step) 

What Is The Best Yarn For Baby Blankets?    

Fibers

The best yarn for baby blankets depends on various factors such as softness, durability, ease of care, and personal preference. 

Here are some popular yarn options for baby blankets:

Acrylic Yarn:

  • Pros: Affordable, widely available, and easy to care for. It’s also durable and can withstand frequent washing.
  • Cons: Some people might find it less breathable than natural fibers.

Cotton Yarn:

  • Pros: Soft, breathable, and hypoallergenic. Suitable for warmer climates and babies with sensitive skin.
  • Cons: It may not be as warm as other options, and it tends to stretch more.

Merino Wool:

  • Pros: Extremely soft, warm, and breathable. Natural fiber with good moisture-wicking properties.
  • Cons: It can be more expensive, and some people may find it requires more delicate care.

Bamboo Yarn:

  • Pros: Soft, silky, and hypoallergenic. Bamboo has natural antibacterial properties and is breathable.
  • Cons: It may not be as warm as other fibers, and it can be more expensive.

Blend Yarns:

  • Pros: Combining different fibers, such as acrylic and cotton, can offer a balance of affordability, softness, and breathability.
  • Cons: The characteristics will depend on the specific blend.

Tips on choosing the yarn

When choosing yarn for a baby blanket, consider factors like the climate, the baby’s skin sensitivity, and the ease of care for the parents. 

Keep in mind that softer yarns are often more comfortable for a baby’s delicate skin. 

Additionally, choosing machine-washable yarn can make life easier for parents.

Always check the yarn label for care instructions, and consider making a small swatch to test the softness and drape of the yarn before starting your project.

Ultimately, the best yarn for a baby blanket is one that meets your preferences and the specific needs of the recipient.

Learn everything about yarn fibers here – Yarn Types Explained: A Guide To Different Fibers 

Yarn Weight

The best size yarn for a crochet baby blanket depends on your preferences, the desired texture, and the intended use of the blanket.

Common yarn weights for baby blankets include:

  • Fingering or Baby Weight Yarn (Category 1): This yarn is lightweight and produces delicate and soft blankets. It’s suitable for more intricate stitch patterns and is often chosen for lacy or lightweight baby blankets.
  • Sport Weight Yarn (Category 2): Slightly heavier than fingering weight, sport weight yarn is still lightweight and can create soft and comfortable blankets. It works well for a balance between drape and warmth.
  • Worsted Weight Yarn (Category 4): Worsted Weight is a popular choice for baby blankets. It provides a good balance between warmth and durability. Many patterns are designed for worsted-weight yarn, making it widely available and versatile.
  • Bulky Weight Yarn (Category 5): The bulky yarn creates thick and cozy blankets, suitable for colder climates or for babies who need extra warmth. Projects with bulky yarn tend to work up quickly.

My go-to yarn choices for baby blankets are Lion Brand Baby Soft and Baby Bernat Blanket Yarn.

Learn everything about yarn weights here Yarn Weight Guide (+ Conversion Chart) 

baby blanket yarn

What Is The Best Crochet Stitch For A Baby Blanket?    

The best crochet stitch for a baby blanket depends on the desired texture, warmth, and overall look you want to achieve. Here are some popular crochet stitches that work well for baby blankets:

Single Crochet (SC):

  • Pros: Creates a dense and sturdy fabric. It’s easy for beginners and works well for a simple, classic look.
  • Cons: It may not produce a very soft or plush blanket.
  • Learn how to single crochet here – How To Single Crochet (SC)

Half Double Crochet (HDC):

  • Pros: A bit taller than single crochet, providing a quicker project. It’s still dense but has a slightly softer feel.
  • Cons: Less dense than single crochet but more so than double crochet.

Double Crochet (DC):

  • Pros: Works up faster than single crochet and provides a more open and airy fabric. Offers a balance between speed and softness.
  • Cons: It may have larger gaps in the fabric, making it less warm.
  • Learn how to double crochet here – How To Double Crochet (dc) For Beginners

Shell Stitch:

  • Pros: Creates a decorative and lacy pattern. Offers a nice combination of openness and texture.
  • Cons: You can use more yarn, and the open spaces may not be suitable for very small babies.

Basketweave Stitch:

  • Pros: Adds texture and visual interest. It looks like woven strips and provides warmth.
  • Cons: It may require more attention to detail, making it a bit more advanced.

Granny Square:

  • Pros: Classic and versatile. Allows for color changes and various design possibilities.
  • Cons: The traditional granny square might have gaps, but different variations can address this.
  • Learn how to crochet granny squares here – Basic Granny Square Pattern

C2C (Corner-to-Corner):

  • Pros: Creates a textured and visually appealing diagonal pattern. Works up relatively quickly.
  • Cons: The diagonal design may not be suitable for all patterns or preferences.
  • Learn how to crochet C2C here – How To Corner To Corner Crochet (C2C) For Beginners

It’s always a good idea to make a gauge swatch before starting your project.

Crochet Lessons

If you are a beginner and need help with the crochet basics, check out the crochet lessons here – Crochet Lessons {With Video Tutorials}.

There, you will find tutorial posts for all the crochet techniques a newbie needs to know.  

Including how to hold a crochet hook,  the basic crochet stitches, how to create a foundation chain (ch), single crochet stitches (sc), double crochet stitches (dc), treble crochet (tr), how to make a single crochet decrease (sc dec), and all the crochet abbreviations (in UK and US terms) a maker needs to know.

Join The Handy Little Me Facebook Group to connect with more makers.

And if you need more video tutorials, check out my YouTube channel here – Handy Little Me – YouTube.  

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